Book Clubs

Our Library Hosts Two Monthly Book Clubs
Copies kept behind the front desk and call 610-566-1918 ext. 104 to be added to member list.

Evening Book Club meets from 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm on the first Monday every month (unless a Holiday).

September 14 (one week later due to Labor Day): Three Women by Lisa Taddeo

Hailed as “a dazzling achievement” (Los Angeles Times) and “riveting page-turner that explores desire, heartbreak, and infatuation in all its messy, complicated nuance” (The Washington Post), Lisa Taddeo’s Three Women has captivated readers, booksellers, and critics—and topped bestseller lists—worldwide.

 

October 5: Toil & Trouble ​by Augusten Burroughs

From the number one New York Times bestselling author comes another stunning memoir that is tender, touching…and just a little spooky.

“Here’s a partial list of things I don’t believe in: God. The Devil. Heaven. Hell. Bigfoot. Ancient Aliens. Past lives. Life after death. Vampires. Zombies. Reiki. Homeopathy. Rolfing. Reflexology. Note that ‘witches’ and ‘witchcraft’ are absent from this list. The thing is, I wouldn’t believe in them, and I would privately ridicule any idiot who did, except for one thing: I am a witch.”

​November 2: The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson ​

Inspired by the true blue-skinned people of Kentucky and the brave and dedicated Kentucky Pack Horse library service of the 1930s, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a story of raw courage, fierce strength, and one woman’s belief that books can carry us anywhere—even back home.

 

​December 7 (Classic Read): As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

Considered one of the most influential novels in American fiction in structure, style, and drama, As I Lay Dying is a true 20th-century classic. The story revolves around a grim yet darkly humorous pilgrimage, as Addie Bundren’s family sets out to fulfill her last wish—to be buried in her native Jefferson, Mississippi, far from the miserable backwater surroundings of her married life. Narrated in turn  by each of the family members—including Addie herself—as well as others the novel ranges in mood, from dark comedy to the deepest pathos.

The Afternoon Book Club meets from 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm on the 3rd Thursday every month.

September 17: Separation Anxiety by Laura Zigman

A hilarious novel about a wife and mother whose life is unraveling and the well-intentioned but increasingly disastrous steps she takes to course-correct her relationships. Judy never intended to start wearing the dog. But when she stumbled across her son Teddy’s old baby sling during a halfhearted basement cleaning, something in her snapped. So: the dog went into the sling, Judy felt connected to another living being, and she’s repeated the process every day since.

October 15 (Classic Read): Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein is the most celebrated horror story ever written and one of the best-selling books of all time. It is the tale of Victor Frankenstein, a scientist whose unbridled quest for the secret of life unleashes a creature that embodies our deepest fears about the moral bounds of human progress. Ever since the book’s publication in 1818, readers have been fascinated with the iconic image of Frankenstein’s monster and the unresolved ethical questions his creation challenges us to answer.

Frankenstein lives on in countless re-imaginings in literature and film.

 November 19: At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson

In these pages, the beloved Bill Bryson gives us a fascinating history of the modern home, taking us on a room-by-room tour through his own house and using each room to explore the vast history of the domestic artifacts we take for granted. As he takes us through the history of our modern comforts, Bryson demonstrates that whatever happens in the world eventually ends up in our home, in the paint, the pipes, the pillows, and every item of furniture. Bryson has one of the liveliest, most inquisitive minds on the planet, and his sheer prose fluency makes At Home one of the most entertaining books ever written about private life.

 December 17: The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World by Dalai Lama , Desmond Tutu

We get to listen as they explore the Nature of True Joy and confront each of the Obstacles of Joy—from fear, stress, and anger to grief, illness, and death. They then offer us the Eight Pillars of Joy, which provide the foundation for lasting happiness. Throughout, they include stories, wisdom, and science. Finally, they share their daily Joy Practices that anchor their own emotional and spiritual lives.

These selections are Pandemic inspired, not so much to go deeper into despair, but to help lighten the load.

From separation anxiety to true horror, we have to come home again and find joy.