Friday Film Club

Our Friday Film Club in April picks and parlays movies with the letter “P“!   

We ended March with Guillermo del Toro’s Oscar winning best picture, THE SHAPE OF WATER, and critics still say Pan’s Labyrinth is his best movie, so let’s compare and then keep going through Phantom Thread, The Post and ending April in Paris Can Wait.

Films start at 1:00 pm in the library’s upstairs theater and is for adults 18 & up.
Hot Tea, Pastries & Popcorn served and discussion after all movies.

April 6: Pan’s Labyrinth

Pan’s Labyrinth won 3  Academy Awards in 2007: Best Achievement in Cinematography, Best Achievement in Art Direction and Best Achievement in Makeup.

Pan’s Labyrinth” is one of the greatest of all fantasy films, even though it is anchored so firmly in the reality of war. On first viewing, it is challenging to comprehend a movie that on the one hand provides fauns and fairies, and on the other hand creates an inhuman sadist in the uniform of Franco’s fascists.
Review by Roger Ebert

April 13: Phantom Thread

Academy Award nominated Best Picture.
Set in the glamour of 1950’s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutantes and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock’s life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma, who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love.

 

April 20: The Post

Academy Award nominated Best Picture.
Steven Spielberg directs Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks in The Post, a thrilling drama about the unlikely partnership between The Washington Post’s Katharine Graham (Streep), the first female publisher of a major American newspaper, and editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks), as they race to catch up with The New York Times to expose a massive cover-up of government secrets that spanned three decades and four U.S. Presidents. The two must overcome their differences as they risk their careers – and their very freedom – to help bring long-buried truths to light.

 

April 27: Paris Can Wait

Anne (Diane Lane) is at a crossroads in her life. Married to a successful but inattentive movie producer (Alec Baldwin), she unexpectedly finds herself taking a car trip from Cannes to Paris with her husband’s business associate (Arnaud Viard). What should be a seven-hour drive turns into a carefree two-day adventure replete with diversions involving picturesque sights, fine food and wine, humor, wisdom and romance, reawakening Anne’s senses and giving her a new lust for life.